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Featured Faculty - November 2012

 

Nikos Chrisochoides
Faculty, Old Dominion University
Computer Science Department

 


Nikos Chrisochoides, is the Richard T. Cheng Professor in the Computer Science Department of the Old Dominion University and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellow in Medicine and Health in 2007 and a CISE CAREER awardee in 1998 (CCF-9876179). In November 2005, Chrisochoides and his collaborators at Harvard Medical School were the first team of doctors and scientists to complete, in near real-time (less than five minutes), the alignment (non-rigid registration) of pre- and intra-operative MRI brain images using landmark tracking across the entire brain volume and present the results to neurosurgeons during a tumor resection procedure. With his recent work (CSI-719929) he achieved real-time (less than a minute) non-rigid registration of pre- and intra-operative MRI brain images using cooperative architectures based on GPU and multi-core processors. The broader impact of his current NSF funding improves the affordability and accessibility of these procedures by targeting cheaper intra-operative CT Scans and computing platforms that are deployable in the operating room without hindering routine surgery procedures and suffering from network delays.

His current basic research is on parallel mesh generation (CCF-0833081) for Petaflops computers like the Blue Waters (pending NSF grant) and real-time image-to-mesh conversion (CCF-0916526) for biomedical applications such as non-rigid registration for Image Guided Neurosurgery. The focus of his translational research is on the prevention of stroke on the basis of patient-specific blood flow modeling, the accurate tracking of related structures in neurosurgical procedures, and the interactive training of young neurosurgeons in its treatment. He is leading a joint project with outstanding researchers from Germany (Dr. Behr from RWTH Aachen University), Canada (Dr. Vavasis from University of Waterloo) and US (Dr. Audete, from Kitware Inc., Karniadakis from Brown University, Dr. Kikinis from Harvard Medical School). Cerebrovascular disease, or stroke, is one of the leading natural causes of death in US, as well as associated with debilitating morbidity among survivors.

Chrisochoides has been successful in integrating his basic and translational research with the education of his students. His former Ph.D. students are placed in highly competitive research Labs and Universities both in US and Europe. He enjoys teaching undergraduate and graduate classes that interface computer science with other disciplines like math and medicine; an example is medical image computing. He appreciates the importance of attracting and exciting undergraduate students to study math and computer science. For example, in the Fall of 2009 he taught a freshman seminar on "Computers in Health Car" where the students explored the role of computers nand busess models) as a disruptive technology for more affordable and accessible quality health care, for all. In this class he used case studies from computer assisted surgery and specifically image guided therapy.

Chrisochoides has about 150 technical publications in parallel scientific computing and has held visiting positions at Harvard Medical School, MIT, Brown University and NASA/Langley. His research is featured to NSF's Discoveries and Let's Compute a call to "invite all members of the national computing community to join us in addressing a real national challenge - the imperative that we equip a larger and more diverse cadre of our Nation's youth with computing competencies, inspiring larger numbers of these youth to consider the pursuit of rewarding careers in the computing professions."